Posted by: mulrickillion | January 18, 2012

Department of State Announces Publication of 29th edition The World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers Report

Source:  U.S. Department of State

The Department of State’s Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance is pleased to announce its recent online publication of the 29th edition of the State Department’s World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers (WMEAT) report, covering the years 1995-2005, on the State Department’s website at http://www.state.gov/t/avc/rls/rpt/wmeat/2005/index.htm.

Department of State Announces Publication of 29th edition The World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers Report « Full Text Reports…

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[An excerpt from the  WMEAT Report reads]:

Military Expenditures

World

In constant-2005-dollar real-exchange-rate terms, world military expenditures appear to have risen about 30% from 1995 to 2005, reaching nearly $1.2 trillion in 2005. The increase accelerated during the second half of the decade, from less than 6% between 1995 and 2000 to almost 24% between 2000 and 2005. This acceleration appears due chiefly to rising military expenditures by the United States after the September 2001 attacks on New York and Washington, including expenditures for military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.

World military spending per capita appears to have risen by about 15% during the decade, first falling from about $157 in 1995 to about $150 in 1998, then rising to about $180 in 2005.

Relative to the global sum of national GDPs, world military spending declined during the first half of the decade, from about 2.7% to about 2.4%, rising back to about 2.6% during the second half of the decade. The post-Cold-War decline in world military spending as a share of measured global economic output during the last decade of the 20th century was reversed during the first half-decade of the 21st. Nevertheless, in 2005, military spending still accounted for a far lower share of measured global economic output than during 1989, the last year of the Cold War, when it appears to have been about 4.7%. . . .

>>Highlights and Trends [PDF: 1.29MB] [HTML version]

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