Posted by: mulrickillion | October 15, 2011

A Pro-Trade Agenda for U.S. Jobs

By Matthew J. Slaughter, Edward Alden, Thomas A. Daschle, and Andrew H. Card

Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

September 17, 2011
Co-Ed, Wall Street Journal

If there is a single issue on which Republicans and Democrats in Washington should be able to agree, it is that expanded trade is vital for U.S. economic growth and job creation. Exports accounted for more than a third of U.S. economic growth in 2010 and have helped keep the economy out of recession in 2011.

Over the past five years, growth in the big developing economies like India, China and Brazil has been eight times faster than in the advanced economies. America’s economic future depends on it becoming a more successful trading nation, selling U.S.-made goods and services into the world’s fastest-growing markets.

Yet the United States—the country that fathered the modern world trading system—today has no real trade policy. Free trade agreements completed several years ago with South Korea, Panama and Colombia have yet to be approved by Congress. The Doha world trade talks have been dying a slow death for years. And the U.S. has let the European Union, Canada, China and other countries take the lead on trade opening with many of the fast-growing economies of Asia and Latin America. What has gone wrong?

In a Council on Foreign Relations independent task force report being released Monday, we argue that trade policy has stalled because Americans are simply not seeing enough in the way of benefits. . . .

A Pro-Trade Agenda for U.S. Jobs – Council on Foreign Relations

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